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withlovejia:

Good morning all! Saw this message and wanted to share. One thing that I’ve learned my lesson on in life is that none of us will do what we should do until we are ready to do it. No matter how much advice we receive, how many times we’re backed into a corner, or how many times we’re hurt, change doesn’t happen until we are completely fed up and simply decide that we can’t take anymore. No one can “force” change upon us. This goes for all things. It’s up to you to decide when you’ll be the change that you’re worthy and capable of being. You got this. Newsletters will resume in 2 weeks. Sign up at withlovejia.com!

Adding a new column with contextual buttons to an ajax grid (KendoUI)

Adding a new column with contextual buttons to an ajax grid (KendoUI)

I recently had to add a new column to my KendoUI ajax grid which would have buttons representing actions possible on the row item based on the status of the row item. In my case, the row items were forms that were submitted which could have any of these actions possible: Approve/Reject/Remove/Create. This new column needed to have any combination of these buttons present based on the status of…

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icontherecord:

Statement on Bloomberg News story that NSA knew about the “Heartbleed bug” flaw and regularly used it to gather critical intelligence

April 11, 2014

NSA was not aware of the recently identified vulnerability in OpenSSL, the so-called Heartbleed vulnerability, until it was made public in a private sector cybersecurity report. Reports that say otherwise are wrong.

Reports that NSA or any other part of the government were aware of the so-called Heartbleed vulnerability before April 2014 are wrong. The Federal government was not aware of the recently identified vulnerability in OpenSSL until it was made public in a private sector cybersecurity report. The Federal government relies on OpenSSL to protect the privacy of users of government websites and other online services. This Administration takes seriously its responsibility to help maintain an open, interoperable, secure and reliable Internet. If the Federal government, including the intelligence community, had discovered this vulnerability prior to last week, it would have been disclosed to the community responsible for OpenSSL.

When Federal agencies discover a new vulnerability in commercial and open source software – a so-called “Zero day” vulnerability because the developers of the vulnerable software have had zero days to fix it – it is in the national interest to responsibly disclose the vulnerability rather than to hold it for an investigative or intelligence purpose.

In response to the recommendations of the President’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies, the White House has reviewed its policies in this area and reinvigorated an interagency process for deciding when to share vulnerabilities.  This process is called the Vulnerabilities Equities Process.  Unless there is a clear national security or law enforcement need, this process is biased toward responsibly disclosing such vulnerabilities.

ODNI Public Affairs Office

On Women in Tech

leaspensieve:

Most people who follow me on Twitter or Facebook know what I think of most “Women in Technology” (WiT) initiatives. For those who don’t, here’s the gist: While I recognize that they mean well, I think most of them (not all!) are actually doing more harm than good to women in tech. This post is an attempt to explain my views more extensively, at the risk of getting lynched by sexists and feminists alike. Since it’s something I’ve been wanting to write for a while now, it ended up being pretty lengthy, so prepare for a long read.

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